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Click links below to view the Cannondale bikes in our collection:

1984 24"/26" wheels
1986  SM600
1991  SE1000
1992 Delta V 1000
1997 "Stars and Stripes"
1997 Tinker Juarez team bike
1998 Super V 1000 Freeride
1999 F2000
1999 Super V Raven 700

1970

From the 1984 Cannondale catalog: " How we got our name.  In the late summer of 1970 our design studio and workshop were still over the pickle store across from the old station at Cannon RR crossing in lower Connecticut.  Mrs. Forrester had just stewed up a "smelly" batch of pickle relish downstairs.  We had all the windows open and Jager was barking at the 9:27 from Wilton.   We'd been in the place for just two-and-a-half weeks, working day and night, and still hadn't gotten around to putting in a telephone.  So Pete Myers (now in our purchasing department) was dispatched to the pay phone across the street to order one.  He relayed the particulars and was about to hang up when the operator asked how he wanted the phone listed.  Peter paused, looked out over the town green to the rusty cannon inscribed "DALE" , and the back to the old train station.  "Why, ah, Cannondale Corporation,: he replied"
 

1971-1983


1971
Joe Montgomery starts Cannondale at the Cannondale train station in Wilton, Connecticut. The company's initial product is the Bugger, the world's first bicycle-towed trailer. A rolling backpack, the Bugger rides on an angle (not unlike the pack it replaces) and transfers all excess weight directly to the road by its own tires. No weight is added to the bicycle itself.

1972
The Bugger is carefully designed and tested to bring you a whole new world of pleasure and convenience. As a shopping cart, golf cart, camping pack, or picnic toter, behind your bicycle, or walking, its uses are endless. - from Bugger sales literature, 1972.

1973
The Cannondale Corporation manufactures sophisticated backpacking and bicycling equipment for the serious sportsman. Each product is designed to function better and last longer. Their materials used have been chosen for long-term, high-stress performance, regardless of price. - from our 1973 catalog. Here is a remarkable pack designed by and for the serious backpack and cross-country ski enthusiast. Its unique design incorporates only the best qualities of existing packs plus some revolutionary new features. - from our 1973 catalog.

1974
Almost daily during warm weather, Cannondale receives dramatic testimonials on the Bugger's incredible bike packing ability. A 19-year-old boy averaged 90 miles a day from Oakville, Ontario, to Los Angeles with more than 60 lbs. of gear in his Bugger. A 60-year-old man regularly makes the trip from Washington to California with 65 lbs. aboard. The Cannondale Bugger is being used and acclaimed nationally as the scientific answer to bike packing.

1975
Cannondale receives design patent #3,903,944 for a "fabric utility bag".
 
1976
"Cannondale bike packs have now logged millions of satisfied customer miles all over the world. Innovative design firsts and quality craftsmanship have made them the number one choice." - from our 1976 catalog.
1977
Cannondale's Bedford, Pennsylvania, factory opens in a refurbished truck terminal. Total work force: seven.

1978
"Our Winans' Camel packs combine the best features of external frame packs (large capacity with frame-supported platforms for carrying additional gear) with the comfort and trimness of an internal frame design... a philosophy that we've believed in throughout our six years of pack development." - from our 1978 catalog.

1979
"We are often surprised by the accomplishments of our customers. Our gear has accompanied expeditionary groups to some of the world's most remote places... We believe that our products will genuinely contribute to the pleasure of your outdoor travel experiences be you a novice or an expert... they will do what we claim and more." - from our 1979 catalog.

1980
"Our bags are modified mummies. They are roomy, yet heat efficient. The outer shells are 1.9 oz. rip stop nylon. The inner shells are soft, high count nylon taffeta. These fabrics are water-repellant yet breathable. They are filled with Hollofil II insulation by Dupont." - from our 1980 catalog. "Our years of extensive research have led to several innovative patents, which not only improve pack function, but also provide a margin of safety for both the rider and the load." - from our 1980 catalog.

1981
"Cannondale cycling gloves are handmade in Pennsylvania. We hand-crochet our 100% cotton back to precise patterns which assure the fit you want." - from our 1981 catalog. "The Cannondale water bottle is like no other. It is safer and more convenient than any water bottle you have ever used. Don't fight a cage or align a dovetail! Simply place the Velcro loop covered bottle on the Velcro hook covered base." - from our 1981 catalog.
 
1982
Cannondale cycling-specific apparel is introduced.  While primarily designed to carry children, the Bugger III can accommodate your groceries, camping gear, picnic baskets, or whatever you choose to put in it. It's built to give you and everyone in your family a lifetime of use.
 
1983
The ST500, Cannondale's first bicycle, debuts. Its TIG-welded frame with oversized aluminum tubes ushers in a revolution in alternative frame materials. TIG welding is a sophisticated process using an electrical arc shielded by inert gas that makes clean, strong aluminum welds. Our large diameter aluminum alloy tubing is precisely mitered, securely and accurately jigged, and TIG welded by trained craftsmen... Welding disrupts the proper distribution of the alloying elements needed to keep an aluminum alloy at its maximum strength. To return the strength lost through welding, our aluminum alloy frames are solution heat treated at a high temperature, rapidly cooled in a quench bath... The Aluminum Bicycle by Cannondale. At Cannondale, we have recognized the need for a high-performance Sport/ Touring bicycle. Now we have met this need with a bicycle that represents our years of experience as leaders in the bicycling industry...


1984

1984 marked Cannondale's entrance into the mountain bike market.  Their first offering was definitely a different animal.  The oversized aluminum set it apart as did the 13" high bottom bracket and 24" rear wheel.  The SM-500 retailed for $595 and featured the Shimano Deore XT drive train with a Sugino Aero Tour crank.  A few of the oddities included a BMX sized seat post, rear BMX brake and funky looking European sprung saddle.  The 24" rear wheel and BMX brake may have been concessions to the difficulty in working with the aluminum tubing.  The cantilever brake mounts may have been more difficult to attach to the aluminum frame and it may have been tough to manipulate the stays to fit a full sized rear wheel.  The original head badge is shown to the left and was used from 1983 through 1989.  If you preferred to built your own, the SM-300 frame set was available for $395.



Link to the 1984 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site.


1985
 
For 1985, the SM500 (no hyphen now) continues on basically unchanged while being joined by the new SM600 model.  The SM600 uses the same frame while upgrading the parts to mostly Suntour XC including front and rear Roller Cam brakes.  The catalog answers a few of the common questions about aluminum frames.  The SM600 uses a standard 27.2 post while the SM500 continues to use the smaller BMX post with a seat tube shim. Chain stays check in at 17.5" which is reasonable short due to the use of the rear 24" wheels.  From the 1985 catalog: "What about bowed frame tubes?": A by-product of the heat treating process is that some frame tubes become bowed.  These warpages have no effect on the bicycle's performance because Cannondale frames are aligned after heat treating to assure that the will track perfectly.

 


Link to the 1985 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site.


1986

1986 sees the introduction of 26" wheels front and rear on the SM500 and SM600 models.  The SM500 retails for $550 as a complete bike or $260 for the frame set.  Components mainly consists of the Suntour XC Sport drive train with Roller Cam brakes front and rear.  The SM600 and SM700 models use the same component group, Suntour XC, but the SM700 substitutes a 24" rear wheel for the 26" wheel on the SM600.  Price for the bikes came in at $699.95.  The bottom brackets are still at 13".  The SM700 with the 24" rear wheel results in a one inch shorter chain stays/wheelbase for better climbing.  All models have switched to the 27.2 seat post.  Forks are still using a flat crown design.



Link to the 1986 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site.


1987

The 1987 model line expands to 5 models: SM900 ($999.99), SM800 ($799.99), SM600 ($650.00), SM500 ($550.00) and SM400 ($475.00).  The catalogs notes that frame sets will no longer be sold separately due to unprecedented demand for complete bikes.  The SM500-SM900 uses the same geometry which is slightly updated to include  17.75" chain stays (subtract 1" with 24" rear wheel), and 71/72 degree geometry.  The SM400 uses more of a "comfort" geometry including lengthy 18.5" stays.  The 16" frames of the SM500-SM900 bikes use dual 24" wheels for more stand over clearance.  The SM600 and SM800 are available with either the 24" or 26" rear wheels while all other models are dual 26" wheels.  The color selections have brightened up considerably to include pinks, bright greens, yellows with many models using color coordinated components.  Custom airbrushed graphics are also offered to further personalize the bikes.  All bikes now use unicrown forks with all but the SM400 using small reinforcing tabs to reinforce the crown area.  For components, the SM900 started with a nearly complete Suntour XC 9000 index shifting group with Roller Cams front and rear and even a Hite Rite.  The SM800 used the same drive train but substituted les expensive parts such as stem/pedals/hubs and used Sport level Roller Cams on both ends.  The rear brakes are run on the seat stays while many manufacturers had moved them onto the chain stays.  The SM600 used the Shimano Deore index group while the SM500 used the basic Suntour 3000 index parts.  Both used the Sport level Roller Cam brakes front and rear.  The SM400 uses a Suntour 3000 drive train with a little lesser quality part but also used the more relaxed geometry and 1.5" tires. 

 
Link to the 1987 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site.

November 1987 Bicycle magazine article with several different mountain bikes including the Cannondale SM900:
Cannondale Cannondale Cannondale Cannondale Cannondale Cannondale Cannondale Cannondale Cannondale Cannondale Cannondale
 


1988

 Cannondale finally adds a full Deore XT bike in the form of the SM1000 Red Shred.  Pretty much the top components of the day including a Nitto stem, Turbo saddle, Hite Rite and rear U brake and the bike features a custom graphics package on the red paint.  The new SM700 used the Deore drive train with Dia Compe brakes (U rear) and Sansin hubs.  In a continued effort to lower the cost of entry to the sport, Shimano and Suntour introduce decent less expensive parts which can be  found on the SM500 and SM600.  The SM600 uses the new Suntour XCD drive train with Dia Compe brakes and is finished in black with red highlights (cables, stem, seat and toe clips). The SM600 is the only model to still be outfitted with a 24" rear wheel which reduces the chain stays to 16.75" from the now-standard 17.5".  The SM500 uses the Exage parts from Shimano which has similar features to the higher end parts (U brakes, index shifting) but used less expensive materials, such as steel on nylon, in place of aluminum.  The SM500 even offered the custom graphics option found on the Red Shred while taking over the role of "comfort" oriented bike from the SM400, of 1987, with longer stays (18.5") and a more relaxed geometry.  The bottom bracket is also lowered to 11" from the standard 13" of the SM600-SM1000.  The 16" frames (SM600-SM1000) continue to use the 24" wheels front and rear.


Link to the 1988 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site.


1989 

Cannondale introduces the new 3.0 frame with a weight of 3.6 pounds which is available with a level top tube in the SM2000, SM800, SM500 and SM400 models and with a sloping top tube in the SM900 and SM600 models.  Frames are still available in either style with the level top tube frames being offered in 130mm or 135mm rear spacing.  The top SM2000 uses the new Shimano Deore XT II components with 7 speeds as well as other op components such as a Turbo saddle, Nitto stem, Hite Rite and was listed at 26.3 pounds.  The SM900 Red Shred (27.4 pounds) continues on with the new Deore II 7 speed components group including the rear U brake.  The model name loses the back ground graphics using just stylized letters.   The Suntour XCD 6000 parts are found on the SM800 (27.6 pounds) while the SM600 (27.7 pounds) uses the new Mountain LX parts on the sloping top tube frame.  The SM500 (28.2 pounds) uses Suntour XCE parts while the least expensive SM400 (28.6 pounds) uses Shimano Light action parts.  The level top tube bikes use 17" stays, cantilever rear brake and an 11.63" high bottom bracket.  The sloping top tube bikes use the same 17" (except for the 16" frame with 24" wheels-16.75" stays), rear U brake and a 13" high bottom bracket.


Link to the 1989 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site.



1990 

In addition to the new logo, all Cannondale mountain bikes now have a cantilevered rear replaceable drop out, 16.9" stays and dual 26" wheels on all models.  The Competition Series consists of the SM2000, SM1000, SM800 and SM700 all of which use .25" less trail (Cannondale aluminum fork on the SM2000 and Ritchey Logic on all others).  The SM2000 adds a Cannondale made 285 stem (285g) to the new Rapid Fire Shimano Deore XT parts group and weighs in at 24.9 pounds.  The SM1000 substitutes the DX Rapid Fire group and weighs 25.8 pounds.  The Red Shred SM800 is joined by the Chameleon SM800 which uses the Shimano Deore LX group with the DX shifters and weighs in at 27.3 pounds.  The sloping top tube model still uses the 13" high bottom bracket.  The SM700 (26.9 pound) uses similar parts to the SM800 but puts them on the regular level top tube frame  with an Odyssey Aereator seat post pump.  The SM600, SM500 and SM 400 use the Exage 500 LX, Suntour XCE and Suntour XCM components.  Cannondale also introduces the SH400 and SH600 hybrid models with mountain bike components and 700 x 35 knobby tires. 


Link to the 1990 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site.



1991  

The big news for 1991 is the introduction of Cannondale's first full suspension design, the E.S.T. (Elevated Suspension Technology).  The front suspension was handled by a Girvin Flex stem.  According to the catalog: "And because the swing arm is hinged above the chain, not of you pedaling energy gets lost compressing the shock."  Rear suspension designs always made mounting cantilever brakes difficult so Cannondale came up with the "Force 40" brake routing.  The name came from the 40% increase in stopping power and eliminated the need for a cable stop on the frame.  A pulley was mounted to the frame while the cable housing ended at a machined aluminum stop mounted on the straddle wire.  These led to a very mushy feeling brake that was difficult to adjust.  If adjusted properly they were pretty powerful but it was to be soon updated by Cannondale.   For '91, there were three E.S.T. models: SE Omega, SE2000 and SE1000.  All three used the same frame, Force 40 brakes, Pepperoni aluminum fork and Girvin Flex Stem but differed in component spec.  The Omega used a Mavic headset, Cook Bros crank and bottom bracket, XT clip less pedals, Hyperlite bars and a Suntour XC Pro drive train.  The popular SE2000, as seen above, used a Deore XT thumb shift group while the SE1000 was a Suntour XC Comp bike. 

On the hard tail side, the bikes now had welded on cable stops for the rear brake which replaced the plastic guides and full length housing.  The "Mud cutter" chain stays helped avoid mud build-up and eliminated the previous crimped chain stays.  The SM2000 (Deore XT), SM1000 (XC Comp) and SM700 (Deore LX) continued the Competition Series with the 3.0 frame and Pepperoni aluminum fork with .25" less fork rake.  The SM800 becomes the "Beast of the East" with the 13" high bottom bracket and Pepperoni fork and finally switches to a rear cantilever brake.  The regular 3.0 Series bikes continues with the SM700 (Deore LX), SM500 (Suntour X-1) and SM400 (Suntour XCM).  All bikes use 16.9" chain stays.  The SE1000 and SM1000 use the Grip Shift shifters, while the SE Omega, SE2000 and SM2000 use thumb shifters (all other bikes use under bar shifters). 

The 1991 catalog is the first Cannondale catalog that puts the mountain bikes in front of the road bikes.


Link to the 1991 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site.

 

1992  
 
The big news for 1992 is the introduction of the Delta V front suspension system.  The Delta V moves the inner working of the suspension into an oversized head tube that runs on a 45mm sealed cartridge bearing head set.  The fork blades are the oversized aluminum Pepperoni blades.  Traditional telescoping forks were having rigidity issues since the small diameter fork blades moved independently of each other and would bind when side-loaded.   With the rigid Pepperoni blades this problem was greatly reduced.  The fork used an air spring with a hydraulic damping unit which was adjustable using the "Dampening Dial" located on top of the stem.  The fork rode on 4 sets of needle bearing which eliminated much of the stiction of the traditional forks.  The biggest negative of the system was the lack of compatibility.  Other bikes didn't have a large enough head tube to accept the system so it could not be retrofitted to other bikes.  It also required the use of a Cannondale specific stem.  The Delta V was added to the E.S.T. rear suspension on the Delta V2000 (Deore XT. 27.5 pound) and Delta V 1000 (XC Comp Micro Drive. 27 pound).  The Delta V 900 was the hard tail version which used Deore LX parts and weighed 26 pounds.  The 3.0 Series continues of with the M2000 (Pepperoni fork, Force 40, Deore XT, 24.5 pounds), M1000 (Pepperoni fork, Force 40 brakes, Suntour XC Comp Micro Drive, 24.0 pounds), M800 (Beast of the East, 13" bottom bracket, Pepperoni fork, Force 40 brakes, Deore LX parts, rear cantilever brake, 25.5 pounds), M700 (Pepperoni fork, Force 40 brakes, Deore LX parts, 25.5 pounds), M500 (Cro-moly fork, Exage 500 LX parts, traditional brakes, 27.5 pounds) and M400 (Cro-moly fork, traditional brake routing, Suntour XCM Lite, 27.5 pounds).   The M700 and above all use thumb shifters as the STI push-push and Suntour X-Press shifters have fallen out of favor with "serious" riders.

The 2.8 Series road frame is introduced with manipulated tubing shapes and a claimed weight of 2.8 pounds.

The XYZ bar ends are added to the 285 stem as Cannondale made components.


Link to the 1992 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site.


1993  
 
For the third year in a row, suspension is the big news at Cannondale.  This year, it is the introduction of the Super V, a revised full suspension platform.  The Super V sports a "V" configured frame with a new swing arm suspended by a Fox air shock.  The Super V3000 uses the top line Shimano XTR components, Delta V suspension fork and is listed at 25.5 pounds.  The Delta V full suspension models continues with the Delta V2000 (Shimano XT, 27.5 pounds) and Delta V1000 (Suntour XC Comp Micro Drive, 27.0 pounds).  The Delta V front suspension line consists of the Delta V1500 (Shimano Deore XT, 26 pounds) and Delta V700 (Shimano New Deore LX, 27 pounds).  The 3.0 Series (1: light weight 2: vibration damping 3:responsive) changes little from the previous year.  The Pepperoni fork goes to a 1.25" steerer tube on all but the SM500 which uses a conventional steel fork.  Models are the M2000 (Deore XT 24.5 pounds), M1000 (Suntour XC Comp Micro Drive, 23.75 pounds), M800 ("Beast of the East", Deore LX, 25.5 pounds), M700 (Deore LX, 25.0 pounds) and M500 (Shimano Altus, steel fork, 27.5 pounds).  All models use a new Force 40 system with a small frame mounted cam replacing the brass pulleys.  Once again, thumb shifters rule.  All models except the M500 and Super V3000 (XTR Rapid Fire Plus) use thumb shifters. The CODA (Cannondale Only Design Application) components lines is expanding.  In addition to the XYZ bare ends, we have seat collars, bars, grips and brakes (Dia Compe 986).  Most of the parts are offered in anodized colors and use throughout the model line. 


Link to the 1993 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site.


September 1993 press releases stating that Cannondale would distribute MM parts under the CODA brand :
Cannondale  Cannondale


1994  

1994 marks the introduction of the Headshok name which takes over for the Delta V.  The Headshok family includes the RDC (remote damping control, air/oil), DD (Damping Dial, air/oil), ELS (elastomer with bearings), ELS2 (elastomer, bushings) and CMT (elastomer for commuter bikes).  The Super V lines expands to three models: SV3000 (Headshok RDC, Magic crank, Ti Syncros post, Piranha Racing brakes, XTR shifters, XT derailleurs, 25 pounds, MSRP $3,600), Super V2000 (RDC, XT derailleurs, XTR shifters, 25.5 pounds) and Super V1000 (DD, LX/XT parts, 26.25 pounds).  The Delta V hard tails have four models: Delta V1000 (RDC, LX/XT parts, 25.5 pounds), Delta V700 (ELS, XT/LX, 26 pounds), Delta V600 (ELS, LX/STX parts, 26.25 pounds) and Delta V 500 (ELS2, Alivio/STX, 28.25 pounds). 

When Cannondale introduced the Delta V/Headshok suspension, one of the negatives was the raised front end.  With the shock "under" the frame, stand over height would be greatly reduced.  The answer was the "V" configured frame which lowered the stand over, strengthened the front end and as a bonus....looked cool.   Since it had sold well, Cannondale decided to add a rigid version of the frame as the Killer V.  Models included the Killer V3000 (Pepperoni 1.25", Hugi hub, Magic crank, XT, 23 pounds), Killer V2000 (Pepperoni 1.25", XT, 23.75 pounds) and Killer V900 (Pepperoni 1.25", LX/XT, 24.25 pounds) and all used the Aheadset threadless system.  The M800 (Beast of the East) and M700 use the 1.25" Pepperoni and an XL/LX parts mix.  The M500 and M600 use an LX/STX parts mix with the M600 having a sloped top tube and Pepperoni fork.

 
A new 3.8 frame is found on the basic M400 and M300 models as well as a 24" wheeled MCX24. 

All 3.0 and 3.8 Series frames come in a 14" frame size that uses the "V" configuration.  The M500 and above models use the Force 40 brake system. 

The CODA component brand expands yet again.  The Magic Motorcycle designed crank which is available in both the standard bolt circle or the newer compact pattern.  There is also a 90g front hub, Sugino/made 500M crank, relabeled Spinergy wheels, XYZ bar with integrated bar ends, Competition and Performance bars, Lizard grips and redesigned brakes with small window in the arms and new pads.

And if that all isn't enough, Cannondale starts the annoying habit of mid-year bikes.  These are usually based on response in the marketplace to how well the regular models are selling.  They often fill in a perceived missing price point or replace a slow selling model.  Since Cannondale builds their bikes "in-house" they are able to respond more quickly than a company who makes bikes overseas.  The new models include a Super V900 (DD2 elastomer Headshok oil damped with lock out, onZa brakes, LX/Grip Shift, onZa pedals), Delta V1000 (RDC, onZa pedals, Grip Shift, XT), Delta V700 (DD2, onZa pedals, Grip Shift), F600 (Headshok EDM elastomer w/ lock out, Grip Shift/LX), F500 (EDM, Grip Shift/STX) and F400 (3.0 with Rock Shox Quadra 10, STX/Grip Shift).  The new models all sport a wishbone seat stay to reduce weight.  The M300 is also offered in a mixte "ladies" frame.   Many of these new models use components (onZa, Grip Shift, Sun rims) that are sponsors of the Volvo-Cannondale race team. 

The V4000 is shown in the mid year catalog.  It is listed as weighing 20 pounds and is listed as "in development" IT was designed in conjunction with Magic Motorcycle and the one sided fork may have been the spiritual predecessor of the "Lefty" suspension fork.


Link to the 1994 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site. 



1995  


It is hard to believe that just over a decade ago, Cannondale offered one model of mountain bike.  Counting different frame configurations, they are now up to 23 different models. 

The Headshok fork line consists of the DD (air/oil w/ on the fly lock out, Pepperoni blades), DD2 (hydraulic damped, on the fly lock out, Pepperoni blades), DD# (hydraulic damped, on the fly lock out, Cro-moly blades) and EDM (MCU shock damper cartridge).  

The news for the Super V line is the new HCV-440 carbon fiber swing arm that increase stiffness by 40% and drops 400 g of weight.  Models include Super v 2000 (HCV-440, CODA 501 crank, DD fork, XT/Grip Shift), Super V 1000 (HCV-440, DD2, XT/Grip Shift. onZa pedals), Super V 900 (aluminum swing, DD2, STX/Grip Shift) and Super V 700 (aluminum swing, EDM, Alivio/Grip Shift).  The HCV-440 swing arm is available to upgrade any Super V model from any year. 

The 2.8 hard tail frame uses a swaged sown tube, wishbone stays and butted tubing comes in at 3.1 pounds.  Models include the F1000 (DD, XT/Grip Shift, onZa pedals) and F700 (DD2, XT/Grip Shift, onZa pedals).  Both models are also available in the Delta V style frame for increase clearance. 

The 3.0 series frame is now available with a Headshok.  Models are the F600 (DD2, STX/Grip Shift) and F500 (EDM, Alivio/Grip Shift).  The F600 is also available with the Delta V style frame.

3.8 series front suspension bikes include the F400 (Rock Shox Quadra 5) and F200 (SR Duo  Track).

The Killer V's come suspension-ready by just replacing the Pepperoni rigid fork.  The Killer V 900 (Grip Shift/XT, onZa pedals) and Killer V 500 (STX/Grip Shift) make up the line.

The 2.8 continues on in the hard tail line with the M900 (XT, Grip Shift, Pepperoni) and M500 (STX, Grip Shift, Pepperoni) while the M800 Beast of the East continues in the line with its 3.0 frame with 13" bottom bracket.

All models above use the the Force 40 brake system.  The Killer V's and M800 continue on with the cantilevered drop out design while all others revert to a more traditional drop out design.  Black sidewall tires are starting to creep into the line, mainly in the low to mid priced bikes. 

 The entry level 3.8 frame comes in the M400, M300 SE (Sport Edition) and M300 LE (Luxury Edition) and well as a ladies mixte frame.  There are 2 24" wheel bikes available, the MC500 and MC400.

The CODA parts line continues to expand as well.  The M900 Magic Motorcycle crank ($650 retail) is joined by the CNC 501M crank.  The 501 uses a one-piece CNC chain ring set that attaches to the arm via 4 bolts.  The Sugino 500 crank, 900M front hub, Competition bar, Performance bar and Lizard grips continue.  The XYZ bar ends are shortened  tot he XYZ Super Shorties.  The brake is redesigned again (700M) and are paired with a set of 900M brake levers (Dia Compe SS-5).  These components are used heavily in the bike line to differentiate them from mostly Shimano bikes of the competitors.  The mountain bikes are also 100% Grip Shift and Sun rim equipped while most bikes use DID chains in keeping with the Volvo team sponsors. 

 

Link to the 1995 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site.

1996  

CODA components for 1996:

Cranks:  The Magic Motorcycle designed 900 series crank is available for road or mountain.   CNC hollow arms are fitted with CNC chain rings and a proprietary bottom bracket assembly.  The 900 R road crank is available with clear anodized arms and clear or black anodized rings.  The 900M crank is available in regular or compact ring sizes and comes with clear anodized arms and your choice of clear or black anodized rings.  The 701M and 502M cranks feature on piece CNC chain ring sets that are attached to the right arm via 4 bolts.  The M701 weight 550 g and is machined from 7075-T6 aluminum and uses a heavily sculpted spider.  The 502M crank appears similar but weighs 640 g and uses less weight saving machine work.  The 500M crank is a standard mid-price replacement crank. 

Hubs:  The 900M front hub weighs in at 99 g, uses sealed cartridge bearings and titanium axle ends.  It is available in silver or pewter  in 28, 32 or 36 hole drillings.   The 900R rear hub uses a USA CNC body with a Hugi star ratchet mechanism.  Choice of 130, 135 or 140mm spacing in 28, 32, 36 or 40 hole spoke drillings (Silver only).  CODA quick release levers are available to match the hubs. 

Wheels: The full line of Spinergy  Rev-X wheels are being sold with CODA decals (road and mountain).

Brakes: The 900M brake levers are 69g per pair and look to be sourced from Dia Compe (pewter color only).  The 700M cantilevers have long slotted curved arms and came in silver or pewter.  The H-pipe was available to replace the troublesome Force 40 cams.

Bars and grips:  Competition bars were 160g and came in a Ti finish or Pewter.  The Performance bar was 220g and only made in silver.  The extra long XYZ 3 dimensional bar ends were accompanied by the more traditional Baba Bar ends.  Grips included the Lounge Lizards, Thins Lizards and Fat Lizards.  The Lounge were only in black while the Thin and Fats came in clear, clear blue, clear violet and black. 

 Seat and Seat posts: CODA 1000 saddle (leather, Ti rails, 230g), CODA 900 saddle (Ti rails, 250g) and 700 (290 g).  A suspension seat post using the Headshok technology is also available. 

Bikes:

Super V DH active: 6" rear and 4.5" Moto fork front travel, single 48 tooth chain ring

Super V Active: New design using a front end similar to the Super V  but with a revised rear to make the suspension more active.  Models include the 3000 (Fatty, CODA 900M crank, XTR, X-Ray, onZa HO brakes), 2000 (Fatty, CODA M701 crank, XT, onZa HO brakes, X-Ray) and 1000 (DD50, CODA 300 crank, LX).

Super V: Older design continues on with the Carbon 900 (carbon swing arm, DD50, LX, CODA 300 crank) and Carbon 700 (carbon swing arm, STX, Rock Shox Quadra)

Hard tail line
: F3000 (CAAD 3,Fatty, XTR, onZa HO brakes, CODA 900M crank, X-Ray), F1000 (CAAD 3, Fatty, CODA 701M, XT, onZa HO brakes), F700 (CAAD 3, DD50, XT, X-Ray), F600 (CAAD2, DD50, LX0, F500 (CAAD2, MC50, STX), F400 (CAAD 2, Quadra, STX), F200 (CAAD 1, suspension fork)

Full Rigid line: includes 2 Killer V models, 900 and 500 and 7 standard models, M900 (CODA M701, X-Ray, P Bone fork), M800 (Beast of the East), M500, M400, M300, M200SE and M200LE (available in a Mixte frame).

There are also 3 models of BMX frames, suspension hybrids, road bikes, touring bikes, tri bikes and pictures of the Slice road project monocoque frame.


Link to the 1996 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site.


1997  

 CODA components for 1997:

Cranks and pedals:  The Magic Motorcycle designed 900 series crank is available for road or mountain.  The 900Downhill crank uses the regular 900M arms but adds a single CNC chain ring with integrated chain guard.  CNC hollow arms are fitted with CNC chain rings and a proprietary bottom bracket assembly.  The 900 R road crank is available with clear anodized arms and clear or black anodized rings.  The 900M crank is available in regular or compact ring sizes and comes with clear anodized arms and your choice of clear or black anodized rings.  The 701M and 502M cranks feature on piece CNC chain ring sets that are attached to the right arm via 4 bolts.  The M701 weight 550 g and is machined from 7075-T6 aluminum and uses a heavily sculpted spider.  The 502M crank appears similar but weighs 640 g and uses less weight saving machine work.  The 400M crank is a standard mid-price replacement crank.  A new Wellgo sourced CODA clip less pedal is added to the CODA line-up.

Hubs:  The 900M front hub weighs in at 99 g, uses sealed cartridge bearings and titanium axle ends.  It is available in silver or pewter  in 28, 32 or 36 hole drillings.   The 900R rear hub uses a USA CNC body with a Hugi star ratchet mechanism.  Choice of 130, 135 or 140mm spacing in 28, 32, 36 or 40 hole spoke drillings (Silver only).  CODA quick release levers are available to match the hubs.  New hubs for 1997 include the 901M and 901D (oversized axle, D is for disc brakes) and the Moto 120 and Moto 80 for use on the Moto forks.

Wheels: The full line of Spinergy  Rev-X wheels are being sold with CODA decals (road and mountain).  The CODA 900 series hubs are also offered as a complete wheel set with Mavic 217 rims and DT 15-16 gauge spokes. 

Brakes: The 900M brake levers are 69g per pair and look to be sourced from Dia Compe (pewter or silver).  The 700M cantilevers have long slotted curved arms and came in silver or pewter.  The H-pipe was available to replace the troublesome Force 40 cams.  CODA 1000 linear pull brakes are shown in the catalog but not sure that they made it into production.

Bars and grips:  The CODA Thermoplastic bars are new to the catalog (production???).  Competition bars were 160g and came in a Ti finish or Pewter.  The Performance bar was 220g and only made in silver.  The extra long XYZ 3 dimensional bar ends were accompanied by the more traditional Baba Bar ends.  Grips included the Lounge Lizards, Thins Lizards and Fat Lizards.  The Lounge were only in black while the Thin and Fats came in clear, clear blue, clear violet and black.  Calamari and Weave grips are added in clear, black, team red and team yellow.

Seat and Seat posts: CODA 1000 saddle (leather, Ti rails, 230g), CODA 900 saddle (Ti rails, 250g) and 700 (290 g).  CODA 500 and 500W (women's) are added.  A suspension seat post using the Headshok technology is also available. 

Lubricants: A full line of CODA lubes, waxes and polishes are new for 1997.

Bike Highlights:

Super V Raven with an aluminum spine with carbon shells attached.  Components include Spinergy wheel, CODA 900M crank and CODA disc brakes.

Moto 120 and Moto 80 triple clamp forks are found on Super V Active models.   Super V models include the Active 100 and Active 80 frames.  Lots of bikes still have skin wall tires.  Forks include Fatty 70, DD60 and MC60.  The best hard tail is now the F2000.  The Beast of the East continues along with 2 Killer V models. 


Link to the 1997 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site.


1998  

CODA components for 1998:

Cranks and pedals:
  The Magic Motorcycle designed 900 series crank is available for road or mountain.  The 900Downhill crank uses the regular 900M arms but adds a single CNC chain ring with integrated chain guard.  CNC hollow arms are fitted with CNC chain rings and a proprietary bottom bracket assembly.  The 900 R road crank is available with clear anodized arms and clear or black anodized rings.  The 900M crank is available in regular or compact ring sizes and comes with clear anodized arms and your choice of clear or black anodized rings.  The Tarantula cranks are new for 1998 and are available in the DH model or SL model.    The Wellgo sourced CODA clip less pedal becomes the CODA 900 pedal (silver, square shape)  while a new lower priced CODA 500 model is added (black, round shape).

Hubs:  The 900M front hub weighs in at 99 g, uses sealed cartridge bearings and titanium axle ends.  It is available in silver or pewter  in 28, 32 or 36 hole drillings.   The 900R rear hub uses a USA CNC body with a Hugi star ratchet mechanism.  Choice of 130, 135 or 140mm spacing in 28, 32, 36 or 40 hole spoke drillings (Silver only).   A new CODA quick release levers set now has multiple slots in the levers. 901M and 901D (oversized axle, D is for disc brakes) and the Moto 120 and Moto 80 for use on the Moto forks. Disc brake versions of the 900 hubs are available to fit the 4 bolt CODA disc brakes. 

 Wheels:  The CODA 900 series hubs are also offered as a complete wheel set with Mavic 217 rims and DT 15-16 gauge spokes. 

 Brakes: CODA Compact Disc (CD) disc brakes are finally in the catalog.  They are a full hydraulic system that uses a unique 4 bolt rotor system. 

 Bars and grips:  New bars include the Freeride and Riser bars. Competition bars were 160g and came in a Ti finish or Pewter.  The Expert bar replaces the Performance bar.  Calamari and Weave grips are available in clear, black, team red and team yellow while the Lounge Lizard grips are in black only.  Bar end models are the Babu 2 and Paquito.

Seat and Seat posts: CODA 1000 saddle (leather, Ti rails, 230g), CODA 900 saddle (Ti rails, 250g) and 700 (290 g) are now available in Mountain and Road versions.  The mountain version features a dropped nose design.  A suspension seat post using the Headshok technology is also available. 

 Lubricants: A full line of CODA lubes, waxes and polishes are available.

Bike Highlights:

The Raven line expands to 3 models (4000, 3000, 2000).  There are also 2 Freeride Super V models (2000, 1000) that use the new Moto FR fork.  The regular Super V line consists of the 2000, 1000, 900, 700, 500 and 400.  All Super V models are equipped with rear disc brake mounts as are the Moto and Fatty forks.

  Hard tail frames come in CAAD3 Power Pyramid butted and swaged down tube, butted tubing, made in USA), CAAD2 (Butted tubes, hand made in USA) and CAAD1 (hand made in USA).   Suspension forks include the Moto 120, Moto FR, Fatty SL 970mm), Fatty D (60mm) and P Bone D (60mm).  Hard tail models include F2000, F1000, F90, F700, F500 and F400.  The Killer V 900 and 700 make up the Killer V offerings.

The Beast of the East hangs on for another year in the 900 version while the regular rigid models are the M900, M700, M500, M400 and M300 (mixte also).

The Cannondale wheel chairs make an appearance in the catalog with the standard S.S.T. and Road Racer models..

Link to the 1998 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site.


1999  

CODA components for 1999:

Cranks and pedals:  The Magic Motorcycle designed 900 series is now listed for road bikes only.  The Tarantual Competition crank uses a splined bottom bracket and is made from 2000 series aluminum.  The spider is attached with a lock ring and is interchangeable.  The Tarantula Expert crank uses a traditional square taper bottom bracket.   A standard cold forged model is also available as an aftermarket crank  The Wellgo sourced CODA clip less pedal becomes the CODA 900 pedal (silver, square shape)  while a new lower priced CODA 500 model is added (black, round shape).

Hubs:  The 900M front hub weighs in at 99 g, uses sealed cartridge bearings and titanium axle ends.  It is available in silver or with 28 or 32 hole drillings.   The 901 front hub, with oversized axle, is available in a regular or disc brake front plus a rear disc version (Hugi star ratchet).  All 900 series disc hubs are set up for the 4 bolt CODA rotors.  The Moto front hub uses the standard 6 bolt disc mounting system.  Expert level hubs are available in front and rear in regular a 4 bolt disc versions.

  Wheels:  Mountain wheels are available in 2 versions, disc and non-disc.  Both use the Expert hubs, DT spokes, alloy nipples and are hand built.  The disc wheels use Mavic X223 rims and the non disc use the Mavic 317 rims. 

Brakes: CODA Compact Disc (CD) disc brakes continue on.  They are a full hydraulic system that uses a unique 4 bolt rotor system. 

 Bars and grips:  Bars include the Competition (160g, black), Expert (180g, black) and Riser (380g, black).  Calamari and Weave grips are available in clear, black, team blue and team yellow.  Bar end models are the Babu 2 and Paquito.

 Seat and Seat posts: Seats change to the Competition (leather/Kevlar, Ti rails, 229g), Expert (Vinyl/Kevlar, cro-mo rails, 249g) and Performance (Vinyl/Kevlar, steel rail, 294g) in the mountain line and have the same three models in the road versions as well.  The suspension seat post carries forward. 

Lubricants: The lubes are not in the catalog and appear to have been discontinued.

Bike Highlights: The Raven line expands to four regular models (3000, 1000, 900 and 700) plus the Freeride 2000 version.  The standard Super V has 6 regular models (2000, 1000, 900, 700, 500 and 400) plus the Freeride 900 and 700.  Forks include the Moto FR, Super Fatty SL (80mm), Super Fatty D (80mm), Fatty SL (70mm) and Fatty D (70mm).  The CAAD4 frame is new (thinner chain stays, Power Pyramid II down tube, hour glass seat stays and beefy disc mount) and found on the F4000, F3000, F2000 and F1000.  The CAAD3 frame is used on the F900 and F700 while the CAAD2 frame is used on the F600, F500, F400, F300 and M400 (only rigid fork bike).  The Killer V frame is down to the single Killer V 700 model.  The Beast of the East appears to have been laid to rest.  A line of Smooth Riding Bikes (SRB) includes a Super V version.

 
Link to the 1999 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site (early version, top / later version, bottom).

 
2000  

Bike Highlights: The Raven is redesigned and is 1.3 pounds lighter.  The single sided Lefty fork also debuts in 2000 and is used on several models.  The Cannondale Motorcycle also makes its production debut in the catalog. r />
 
Link to the 2000 catalog on the vintage Cannondale web site. 

2003  

Cannondale Corporation (Nasdaq: BIKE), has announced that it intends to file a voluntary petition for reorganization under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code on January 28th, 2003.

Cannondale and its lenders, The CIT/Business Credit, Inc. and Pegasus Partners II, L.P. have reached an agreement in principle that, subject to Bankruptcy Court approval, will provide the Company with interim financing to fund post-petition operating expenses and to meet supplier and employee commitments. “The interim financing will be used to continue the operation of our bicycle business,” said Cannondale Founder and President Joe Montgomery.

 Cannondale has also reached an agreement in principle with Pegasus Partners II, L.P. to sell substantially all of its assets to Pegasus Partners II, L.P. pursuant to Section 363 of the Bankruptcy Code, subject to better and higher offers and court approval. Pegasus would operate the bicycle business as a going concern with the involvement of current management and would purchase separately the Company’s motor sports assets, including the intellectual property related to the design of Cannondale’s motor sports products. In the meantime, management continues to work with other potential interested buyers for either or both of these businesses.

 Because the Company has obtained interim post-petition financing, Cannondale will be able to pay vendors for goods and services received after the filing in the ordinary course of business.

Montgomery explained that difficulties with Cannondale’s motor sports business made the filing necessary, and that the Company has determined to suspend operations of the motor sports division pending a potential sale. “The motor sports division was threatening the bicycle division,” explained Montgomery. “Although we believe in the value of our motor sports products, we did not have sufficient financial resources to make the additional investments necessary. We look forward to bringing a renewed focus to our core bicycle business and to working through this present challenge with the greatest possible speed.”

The suspension of operations of the motor sports division will mean that production workers who had been furloughed from Cannondale’s motor sports factory in Bedford, Pennsylvania in December will not be recalled. Production workers at Cannondale’s Bedford bicycle factory, who have been idled during a recent shutdown, are scheduled to return to work in the near future.

The Company’s foreign subsidiaries are not included in the filing. Business done through Cannondale subsidiaries in Europe, Japan and Australia accounted for approximately 42% of the Company’s total sales in fiscal 2002.  

 

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